Captain Kidd, Jr.*

Role: Mary MacTavish
Co-stars: Douglas MacLean, Spottiswoode Aitken, Robert Gordon, Winter Hall, Marcia Manon, Victor Potel
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: William Desmond Taylor
Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1916 play by Rida Johnson Young
Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from  Variety  (April 25, 1919):

As a whole ‘Captain Kidd, Jr.’ is rather a disappointment. The story isn’t there in picture form, the production is cheap and as a feature production, with Miss Pickford as the star, it fails to stand up at anytime. The only amusing touch in the entire picture was the parrot that shrieked curses on everybody, and these were the only laughs that were forthcoming.


Johanna Enlists

Role: Johanna Renssaller
Co-stars: Anne Schaefer, Fred Huntley, Monte Blue, Douglas MacLean, Emory Johnson, Wallace Beery
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: William Desmond Taylor
Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1917 short story  The Mobilizing of Johanna  by Rupert Hughes
Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (Sept. 16, 1918):

Does anybody in pictures give us better, sweeter, more wholesome and natural comedy than Mary Pickford? And how does she manage to look forever like 14? And what does she do to her lovely face to make it so ugly when she wills? All these things are secrets of her wonderful art, and we would like to know.


How Could You, Jean?*

Role: Jean Mackaye
Co-stars: Casson Ferguson, Spottiswoode Aitken, Herbert Standing, Fanny Midgley, Larry Peyton, ZaSu Pitts
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: William Desmond Taylor
Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1917 novel by Eleanor Hoyt Brainerd
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (July 1, 1918):

Mary Pickford is without doubt the most adorable young thing on the screen, the loveliest, the most fascinating, the best comedienne of them all. And in ‘How Could You, Jean?’ the screen version of one of Eleanor Hoyt Brainerd’s galvanically sprightly stories, our Mary has been given opportunities for comedy that compel her to show us her very best paces.


M’liss

Role: Melissa ‘M’liss’ Smith
Co-stars: Theodore Roberts, Thomas Meighan, Tully Marshall, Charles Ogle, Monte Blue, Winifred Greenwood
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: Marshall Neilan
Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1873 novel by Bret Harte
Cinematographer: Walter Stradling
Filming Location: San Bernardino Mountains near Idyllwyld, CA

Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (April 8, 1918):

It matters not to Mary Pickford whether she is posed as a saint or a little devil – she falls gracefully into either attitude, and stays persistently ‘in the picture’ till the film fades into the circumambient nothing. Which is only another way of telling you – what you know already – that Mary is a consummate actress, imbued with art to her very finger tips, and even to her very toe tips. (Her feet are more expressive than most people’s faces.)


Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley

Role: Amarilly Jenkins
Co-stars: William Scott, Kate Price, Ida Waterman, Norman Kerry, Margaret Landis, Tom Wilson
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: Marshall Neilan
Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1915 novel by Belle K. Maniates
Cinematographer: Walter Stradling
Filming Location: Famous Players-Lasky Studio at 1520 Vine St. in Hollywood, CA

Original review from  Photoplay  (June 1918):

Mary Pickford follows her remarkable ‘Stella Maris’ with another character study scarcely less remarkable, Amarilly Jenkins in ‘Amarilly of Clothesline Alley.’ The role is midway between the hopelessly tragic slavey in ‘Stella Maris’ and the pathetically optimistic Stella herself. … All this is done in Mary Pickford’s blithest vein, reminding us once more that she is the greatest of all screen actresses.


Stella Maris

Role: Miss Stella Maris/Unity Blake
Co-stars: Ida Waterman, Herbert Standing, Conway Tearle, Marcia Manon, Josephine Crowell
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: Marshall Neilan
Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1913 novel by William J. Locke
Cinematographer: Walter Stradling

Original review from  Variety  (Jan. 25, 1918):

… Mary Pickford is given an opportunity to act and the manner in which she grasped it will prove a revelation to her many followers. … There are two characters in Mr. Locke’s story of great importance. One was Stella Maris and the other Unity Blake. Miss Pickford plays them both. In the former she is the sweet ingénue type one expects her to be, but in the latter she is a deformed little slatternly slavey that will make you rub your eyes and look twice to assure yourself it is Pickford.


A Little Princess

Role: Sara Crewe
Co-stars: Norman Kerry, Katherine Griffith, ZaSu Pitts, Ann Schaefer, William E. Lawrence, Theodore Roberts
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: Marshall Neilan
Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1905 novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett
Cinematographer: Walter Stradling
Filming Location: Famous Players-Lasky Studio at 1520 Vine St. in Hollywood, CA
Produced by Mary Pickford

Note: Assistant director Howard Hawks got his first chance to direct when he stepped behind the camera for certain scenes of A Little Princess.

Original review from  Variety  (Nov. 23, 1917):

Miss Pickford … is perhaps in her most fitting role in what was probably the most popular of all Mrs. Burnett’s novels, next to ‘Fauntleroy.’ Everyone who reads it will want to see its picturization. Others shouldn’t miss it. When they go they will find Miss Pickford at her best.


Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm

Role: Rebecca Randall
Co-stars: Eugene O’Brien, Helen Jerome Eddy, Charles Ogle
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: Marshall Neilan
Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1909 play by Charlotte Thompson and Kate Douglas Wiggin, adapted from the 1903 novel by Kate Douglas Wiggin
Cinematographer: Walter Stradling
Filming Location: Exterior scenes shot in Pleasanton, CA. Farm house scenes shot in Gladwyne, PA and at nearby Valley Forge Studios; Interiors shot at Famous Players-Lasky Studio at 1520 Vine St. in Hollywood, CA.

Note: A young ZaSu Pitts had a role as an extra in the film.

From Variety (Sept. 14, 1917):

Superlatives, so indiscriminately used with reference to pictures in many instances, seem inadequate in properly approximating the transcendent merit of the latest Artcraft production, ‘Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm,’ with Mary Pickford in the titular role. It is a master work that is going to stand supreme in its particular niche for several years to come. … Miss Pickford plays as she never played before, varying lights and shades to elicit the major interest, tearful at one moment and laughing the next, holding the auditor at all times in mute admiration.


The Little American

Role: Angela More
Co-stars: Jack Holt, Raymond Hatton, Hobart Bosworth, James Neill, Ben Alexander, Lila Lee
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: Cecil B. DeMille
Screenwriter: Jeanie Macpherson, Cecil B. DeMille and Clarence J. Harris (uncredited)
Cinematographer: Alvin Wyckoff
Filming Location: Famous Players-Lasky Studio at 1520 Vine St. in Hollywood, CA
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from  Variety  (July 13, 1917):

It’s a Pickford. ‘Nuf said. Just Mary Pickford, the same Mary that one has seen in a score of other pictures, only this time she is made the central figure of a war story. A story that is commonplace enough in itself, but which is saved through the remarkable production that Cecil DeMille has given it.


A Romance of the Redwoods

Role: Jenny Lawrence
Co-stars: Elliott Dexter, Tully Marshall, Raymond Hatton, Charles Ogle, Walter Lang, Winter Hall
Prod/Dist Co: Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: Cecil B. DeMille
Screenwriter: Cecil B. DeMille and Jeanie Macpherson
Cinematographer: Alvin Wyckoff
Filming Location: Exteriors shot near Santa Cruz, CA; Interiors shot at Famous Players-Lasky Studio at 1520 Vine St. in Hollywood, CA.

Original review from  Current Opinion  (July 1917):

As usual, Mary Pickford, for whom this scenario was written, carries the honors and success of the picture on her capable shoulders. Without her charm and simplicity of acting it would be quite another story. … It is remarkable how much Mary Pickford makes of a series of very ordinary situations in what would otherwise be a mediocre melodrama.


Poor Little Rich Girl

Role: Gwendolyn, ‘Gwen’
Co-stars: Madlaine Traverse, Charles Wellesley, Gladys Fairbanks, Frank McGlynn, Emile LaCroix, Marcia Harris, Herbert Prior
Prod/Dist Co: Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: Maurice Tourneur
Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1913 play by Eleanor Gates
Cinematographers: John van den Broek, Lucien Andriot
Filming Location: Biograph Studios, Fort Lee, New Jersey

Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (March 13, 1917):

A curious and appealing combination of delightful comedy and fairy story with a moral is ‘Poor Little Rich Girl.’ Mary Pickford is its star … and the Pickford star is of the never-grow-old type. She looks a trifle older than 11 years, but she is the child in manner, feeling and appearance, too, in her skirtlets and pajamas. … A pretty and amusing play – with some faults and lumps to swallow – but, altogether, good. And then – it has Mary!


The Pride of the Clan

Role: Marget MacTavish
Co-stars: Matt Moore, Warren Cook, Kathryn Browne Decker, Ed Roseman, Joel Day
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: Maurice Tourneur
Screenwriter: Scenario by Elaine S. Carrington and Charles E. Whittaker
Cinematographers: John van den Broek, Lucien Andriot
Filming Location: Marblehead, MA

Note: Co-star Matt Moore was Owen Moore’s brother, and a successful actor in his own right. The Pride of the Clan was the first film shot in the Marblehead area.

Original review from  Forest Leaves  (Jan. 12, 1917):

The wonderful heart appeal as well as the dramatic finesse in ‘The Pride of the Clan’ makes it an offering that will prove of universal appeal. … Mary Pickford’s appearance is always one of charm. No matter whether she is in rags, there is always the same charm, the same winsomeness and the same sweetness that makes her so appealing to everyone.


Less Than the Dust

Role: Radha
Co-stars: David Powell, Frank Losee, Mary Alden, Mario Majeroni, Caesere Gravina, Francis Joyner, Russell Bassett, Nathaniel Sack
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Artcraft Pictures Corporation
Director: John Emerson
Screenwriter: Scenario by Hector Turnbull
Cinematographer: George W. Hill
Produced by Mary Pickford

Less Than the Dust  was the first film released under Famous Players’ new Artcraft division.

Original review from  The Motion Picture World  (Nov. 18, 1916):

Artcraft’s bow to the photoplay public is a most happy one. It provides in the first place an excellent story; in the second place it brings back to the screen Mary Pickford, now for several months among the absentees. … The story is ‘very much Pickford’ but by no manner of means is it ‘too much Pickford.’ The popular player dominates the production, but she has fine support – from every department that enters into the making of a picture.