Secrets

Role: Mary Marlowe/Mary Carlton
Co-stars: Leslie Howard, C. Aubrey Smith, Ned Sparks, Blanche Friderici, Doris Lloyd, Herbert Evans, Allan Sears
Prod/Dist Co: The Pickford Corporation/United Artists
Director: Frank Borzage
Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1922 play by Rudolf Besier and May Edginton; additional dialogue by Salisbury Field and Leonard Praskins
Cinematographer: Ray June
Produced by M.C. Levee and Mary Pickford
 
Note: Leslie Howard’s role was originally intended for Gary Cooper.
 

Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (June 19, 1933):

Mary Pickford gives a sterling proof of her capacity as an actress in ‘Secrets.’ … A genuinely poignant sequence is the death of the heroine’s baby during the western scenes… This scene is the high point of the picture dramatically, and shows that in evoking a depth of sympathetic feeling Miss Pickford can be as able and convincing as ever. Handkerchiefs were abundantly in evidence during its unfoldment.


Taming of the Shrew

Role: Katherine
Co-stars: Douglas Fairbanks, Edwin Maxwell, Dorothy Jordan, Joseph Cawthorn, Clyde Cook, Geoffrey Wardwell
Prod/Dist Co: The Elton Corporation, The Pickford Corporation/United Artists
Director: Sam Taylor
Screenwriter: Sam Taylor, adapted from the play by William Shakespeare
Cinematographer: Karl Struss
Art Decorators: William Cameron Menzies and Laurence Irving
Editor: Allen McNeil
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from  Variety  (Dec. 4, 1929):

A money picture, easily, for it’s worth 75 cents for anyone to see Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks do this kind of stuff in a vastly extravagant burlesque of Bill Shakespeare’s best laugh. The two stars often turn that into a howl. … As this was built for laughs only and gets them, nothing else matters. For laughs get money, and besides the laughs you have Mary Pickford, with Douglas Fairbanks – and Shakespeare at last!


Coquette

Role: Norma Besant
Co-stars: Johnny Mack Brown, Matt Moore, John St. Polis, William Janney, Henry Kolker, Louise Beavers
Prod/Dist Co: The Pickford Corporation/United Artists
Director: Sam Taylor
Screenwriter: John Grey and Allen McNeil, adapted from the 1927 play by George Abbott and Ann Preston Bridgers; dialogue by Sam Taylor
Cinematographers: Karl Struss and G.W. Bitzer
Set Decorator: William Cameron Menzies
Produced by Mary Pickford and Sam Taylor

Note: Coquette was Mary Pickford’s first sound film, and the film for which she received a Best Actress Academy Award.

Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (April 5, 1929):

‘Coquette’ is the picture, and it is, as the popular designation goes, all talking. It brings Miss Pickford to the screen in a role unlike any that she has ever played previously. It discloses her changed in appearance by virtue of her bobbed hair. It demonstrates that she has a voice of lovely timbre, and that she knows how to use it with taste, and with even more definite discretion. … See ‘Coquette.’ It is another milestone.


My Best Girl

Role: Maggie Johnson
Co-stars: Charles ‘Buddy’ Rogers, Sunshine Hart, Lucien Littlefield, Carmelita Geraghty, Hobart Bosworth, Evelyn Hall
Prod/Dist Co: The Pickford Corporation/United Artists
Director: Sam Taylor
Screenwriter: Allen McNeil and Tim Whelan, adapted by Hope Loring from the 1927 novel by Kathleen Norris
Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
Filming location: Pickford-Fairbanks Studios in Hollywood, CA
Produced by Mary Pickford

Note: Carole Lombard has an uncredited role in the film as a flirtatious shopgirl.

Original review from  Photoplay  (Dec. 1927):

With a story by Kathleen Norris, an adaptation by Hope Loring, an ‘America’s Sweetheart’ to play in it, the picture could not fail to be interesting. … You will carry away memories of the beautiful love episode between Mary Pickford and Charles ‘Buddy’ Rogers. … The love scenes between these two are marvelous – beautiful, clean, and gripping. The best picture Mary has made in several years.


Sparrows

Role: Molly
Co-stars: Roy Stewart, Mary Louise Miller, Gustave von Seyffertitz, Charlotte Mineau, Spec O’Donnell, Lloyd Whitlock
Prod/Dist Co: The Pickford Corporation/United Artists
Director: William Beaudine, Tom McNamara (uncredited)
Screenwriter: Story by Winifred Dunn, adaptation by C. Gardner Sullivan, titles by George Marion, Jr.
Cinematographers: Charles Rosher, Karl Struss, Hal Mohr
Filming Location: Pickford-Fairbanks Studios in Hollywood, CA
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (April 25, 1926):

Among the pictures Mary Pickford has made in the past five or six years, ‘Sparrows’ stands absolutely supreme. By many it will, in fact, be acclaimed her greatest picture. … For ‘Sparrows’ is not only a remarkable triumph for its star – it is one of the most human and thrilling experiences that has ever been offered through the medium of the screen.


Little Annie Rooney

Role: Annabell ‘Little Annie’ Rooney
Co-stars: William Haines, Walter James, Gordon Griffith, Carlo Schipa, Spec O’Donnell, Hugh Fay, Vola Vale
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
Director: William Beaudine
Screenwriter: Louis D. Lighton and Hope Loring, adapted from the story by Mary Pickford (credited as Catherine Hennessey); titles by Tom McNamara (uncredited)
Cinematographers: Charles Rosher, Hal Mohr
Filming Locations: Pickford-Fairbanks Studios in Hollywood, CA
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (Oct. 23, 1925):

A new popular triumph goes to Mary Pickford. Her picture ‘Little Annie Rooney’ will be hailed far and wide as great entertainment. It is the most amusing comedy she has made in ages, and marks her return to the hoyden type of role in which she has always won the height of favor. … From the reception accorded ‘Little Annie Rooney’ last night it would be safe to predict that it will be one of the most enjoyed pictures that Mary has made within the past three or four years.


Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall

Role: Dorothy Vernon
Co-stars: Anders Randolf, Marc McDermott, Carrie Daumery, Allan Forest, Wilfred Lucas, Clare Eames, Estelle Taylor
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Productions/United Artists
Director: Marshall Neilan, Mary Pickford (uncredited)
Screenwriter: Adapted by Waldemar Young from the 1898 novel  When Knighthood Was in Flower  by Charles Major
Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
Filming Locations: Interiors shot at Pickford-Fairbanks Studios in Hollywood, CA; Outdoor scenes shot at Busch Gardens in Pasadena, CA.
Produced by Mary Pickford

Note: Mitchell Leisen designed Mary’s costumes for the film, several of which are in the Natural History Museum in Los Angeles.

Original review from  Photoplay  (July 1924):

This new effort of Mary Pickford, one of the late Charles Major’s historical romances, is exceedingly beautiful pictorially. …. Miss Pickford is  Dorothy  and the title role will please her army of followers. Although lovely optically, it offers little new. Workmanlike of technique, her acting strikes no big spark. It is careful and considered all the way. This mood of care seems to run all through the production.


Rosita

Role: Rosita, a street singer
Co-stars: Holbrook Blinn, Irene Rich, George Walsh, Charles Belcher, Frank Leigh, Mathilde Comont
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
Director: Ernst Lubitsch, Raoul Walsh (uncredited)
Screenwriter: Edward Knoblock and Hanns Kräly, story by Norbert Falk, from the 1844 play Don César de Bazan by Adolphe Philippe Dennery and Philippe François Pinel
Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
Art Decorator: William Cameron Menzies
Filming Location: Pickford-Fairbanks Studios in Hollywood, CA
Produced by Mary Pickford
 
Note: Future Fox star Charles Farrell has a bit part in the film.
 
Original review from  Variety  (Sept. 6, 1923):

Enter Mary Pickford, actress, as Rosita in a screen production of the same name directed by Ernst Lubitsch. A Mary Pickford different and greater than at any time in her screen career; a Mary Pickford with her hair done up, pretty as a picture and displaying acting ability few thought her capable of. … ‘Rosita’ is going to mark an epoch in the career of this star.


Tess of the Storm Country

Role: Tessibel ‘Tess’ Skinner
Co-stars: Lloyd Hughes, Gloria Hope, David Torrence, Forrest Robinson, Jean Hersholt, Danny Hoy
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
Director: John S. Robertson
Screenwriter: Scenario by E. Lloyd Sheldon and Josephine Lovett, adapted by Elmer Harris from the 1909 novel by Grace Miller White and the 1911 play by Rupert Hughes
Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
Filming Location: Lake Chatsworth, CA
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review by Martin J. Quigley (Nov. 1922):

We shall not be surprised if Miss Pickford’s new production of the famous story of ‘Tess of the Storm Country’ becomes the most popular picture ever made. We do not view it as one of those sensational and timely successes which creates a great furor for a moment and then quickly shifts away to make way for another similar skyrocket hit. This picture is almost here to stay; it will go on year after year – and it is eminently deserving of it.


Little Lord Fauntleroy

Role: Cedric Errol/Widow Errol
Co-stars: Claude Gillingwater, Joseph J. Dowling, James A. Marcus, Kate Price, Fred Malatesta, Madame de Bodamere
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
Director: Alfred E. Green, Jack Pickford
Screenwriter: Bernard McConville, based on the 1886 novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett
Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
Filming Location: The Kohl Mansion in Burlingame, CA
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from  Variety  (Sept. 23, 1921):

‘Little Lord Fauntleroy’ is a perfect Pickford picture. … Miss Pickford shows a range of versatility between the blue-blooded and somber mother and the blue-blooded but mischievous kid, that is almost startling. She meets herself many times in double exposures, and she is taller than herself and different from herself, and incredibly true to each.


Through the Back Door

Role: Jeanne
Co-stars: Gertrude Astor, Wilfred Lucas, Helen Raymond, C. Norman Hammond, Elinor Fair, Adolphe Menjou
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
Director: Alfred E, Green, Jack Pickford
Screenwriter: Gerald C. Duffy and Marion Fairfax
Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
Filming Location: Partly shot on location at Ellis Island, NY
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (May 5, 1921):

Miss Pickford’s latest picture, ‘Through the Back Door’ … has the usual smile-and-tear story, but never since ‘Stella Maris’ has Mary revealed more exquisite and compelling powers of successfully paging our smiles and our tears. I’ll defy you not to laugh hilariously at Mary as the mischievous kid, who told to scrub the floor, mounts the two big scrub brushes and uses them as skates over the slippery floor.


The Love Light

Role: Angela Carlotti
Co-stars: Evelyn Dumo, Raymond Bloomer, Fred Thomson, Edward Phillips, Albert Prisco, George Rigas
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Productions/United Artists
Director: Frances Marion
Screenwriter: Frances Marion
Cinematographers: Charles Rosher, Henry Cronjager
Filming Location: Coastal scenes shot near Carmel, CA; Lighthouse scenes shot at Point Fermin, near San Pedro, CA
Produced by Mary Pickford

Note: Initially titled  A Flame in the Dark,  The Love Light  story was conceived by Frances Marion while visiting Italy.

Original review from  Variety  (Jan. 14, 1921):

With any other star ‘The Love Light’ might be classed as an exceptionally good program picture … but with Miss Pickford it is certain to suffer by comparison with her other pictures. She is a symbol of sunshiny girlishness, and does not fit well into a garb of mature morbidity. Mary in motherhood is not Mary as the millions know – and want her.


Suds

Role: Amanda Afflick
Co-stars: Albert Austin, Harold Goodwin, Rosa Dione, Nadine Montgomery, Darwin Karr, Hal Wilson
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
Director: John Francis Dillon
Screenwriter: Scenario by Waldemar Young, based on the 1905 play  Op O’ Me Thumb  by Frederick Fenn and Richard Pryce
Cinematographers: Charles Rosher, L.W. O’Connell
Filming Location: Robert Brunton Studios at 5451 Marathon St. in Hollywood, CA
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (Jul. 12, 1920):

…the Pickfordian cleverness and charm are effulgently present, and the question which was on everybody’s lips some time during the action was, how is it possible for anyone to look so beautiful and so ugly at the same time as Miss Pickford does? … In ‘Suds’ we have, therefore, another gay, glad Pickford feature, with a disappointing finish which is offset, partially, by the cleverness of the star’s artistry.


Pollyanna

Role: Pollyanna Whittier
Co-stars: Wharton James, Katherine Griffith, Helen Jerome Eddy, William Courtleigh, Herbert Prior, Howard Ralston
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
Director: Paul Powell
Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1915 play by Catherine Chisholm Cushing, adapted from the 1913 novel by Eleanor H. Porter
Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
Filming Location: Banks House on Monterey St. in South Pasadena, CA
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (Jan. 20, 1920):

Whatever opinion you may hold of the strength of ‘Pollyanna’ as a play for the screen, you cannot deny the artistry of its star, whose light, far from becoming dimmer as time goes on, seems to be always attaining a nearer place to the zenith of its brightness. … the Mary that is shining forth in the screen adaptation of Eleanor H. Porter’s novel … is a being who radiates a beacon-light ideal – an ideal in which is blended everything that causes human aspiration to be worth while.


Heart o’ the Hills

Role: Mavis Hawn
Co-stars: Harold Goodwin, Allan Sears, Fred Huntley, Clare McDowell, Sam De Grasse, John Gilbert
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/First National Exhibitors’ Circuit
Director: Joseph De Grasse, Sidney Franklin
Screenwriter: Bernard McConville and Madeline Matzen, based on the 1913 novel The Heart of the Hills by John Fox, Jr.
Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
Filming Location:San Bernardino Mountains near Redlands, CA and Big Bear Lake
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from Photoplay (Feb. 1920):

Mary Pickford herself, as the wild little Mavis Hawn, once more enters into her physical descriptions with the fury of a novice who has everything to gain and nothing to lose – and the painstaking care and cunning detail of the celebrated performer who has everything to lose and very little to gain: altogether, an unbeatable combination of talents.


The Hoodlum

Role: Amy Burke
Co-stars: Ralph Lewis, Kenneth Harlan, Dwight Crittendon, Melvin Messenger, Aggie Herring, Andrew Arbuckle
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/First National Exhibitors’ Circuit
Director: Sidney Franklin
Screenwriter: Based on the 1915 novel  Burkses Amy  by Julie Mathilde Lippmann
Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from  Variety  (Sept. 5, 1919):

Whatever others may hand to the First National with the idea of slipping the same thing past the public, Mary Pickford gives that organization the real goods. … ‘The Hoodlum’ will pack them in as it did this week locally, and, better still, it will send them away delighted and happy, for this little blonde star’s amazing talents are hers lightly and charmingly in evidence.


Daddy-Long-Legs

Role: Jerusha ‘Judy’ Abbott
Co-stars: Milla Davenport, Percy Haswell, Mahlon Hamilton, Fay Lemport, Lillian Langdon, Wesley Barry, Marshall Neilan
Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/First National Exhibitors’ Circuit
Director: Marshall Neilan
Screenwriter: Agnes Christine Johnson and Mary Pickford (uncredited), based on the 1912 novel by Jean Webster
Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
Filming Location: Busch Gardens in Pasadena, CA
Produced by Mary Pickford

Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (May 19, 1919):

… You’ve never known Mary Pickford or ‘Daddy-Long-Legs’ either until you’ve seen them in the marvelous picture brew which that amazingly clever young star has given us. ‘Daddy-Long-Legs’ was delicious as a story; delightful as a play, and is entrancing as a picture. A crowded house went fairly into raptures yesterday, and applause, even at that cold 12:45 performance…