Printable Feature Films List

* Indicates that the film is "lost"

    In the Bishop’s Carriage*

    Released September 10, 1913

    Role: Nance Olden
    Co-stars: David Wall, House Peters, Grace Henderson, George Moss, Howard Missimer, Camille Dalberg, John Steppling
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company
    Director: J. Searle Dawley and Edwin S. Porter
    Screenwriter: B.P. Schulberg, adapted from the 1907 play by Channing Pollock, based on the 1904 novel by Miriam Michelson
    Cinematographer: H. Lyman Broening

    Note:  In the Bishop’s Carriage  was remade in 1920 by Realart Pictures with Bebe Daniels in the Nance Olden role.

    Original review from  The Moving Picture World, Sept. 20, 1913:

    It is several months since picture lovers have seen on the screen Mary Pickford in a new film. In this refined melodrama they will see Little Mary in a new light. ‘In the Bishop’s Carriage’ is a crook play; nevertheless its treatment is so artistic, so delicate, so finished, that it will please every division of society.

     

    Caprice*

    Released November 10, 1913

    Role: Mercy Baxter
    Co-stars: Owen Moore, Ernest Truex, Ogden Crane, James Gordon, Boots Wall
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company
    Director: J. Searle Dawley
    Screenwriter: Based on the 1884 play by Howard P. Taylor
    Cinematographer: H. Lyman Broening

    Note:  Originally a stage hit starring Minnie Maddern Fiske, Caprice  was so popular that Paramount re-released it to theaters in 1918.

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (Nov. 15, 1913):

    Little Mary of Biograph fame … will appear in ‘Caprice,’ Mrs. Fiske’s former success. No better play could have been selected for her inimitable daintiness. It is a delightful comedy-drama of love and society, with an echo of the hills mingled with the voice of the city. Mary Pickford in ‘The Bishop’s Carriage’ broke all records at Tally’s Broadway. ‘Caprice’ should prove even more of a drawing card.

     

    Hearts Adrift*

    Released February 10, 1914

    Role: Nina
    Co-stars: Harold Lockwood
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation
    Director: Edwin S. Porter
    Screenwriter: Mary Pickford, based on the 1911 novel  As the Sparks Fly Upward  by Cyrus Townsend Brady
    Cinematographer: Edwin S. Porter
    Filming Location: Los Angeles and Southern California coast

    Note:  Hearts Adrift  was the first feature produced by Famous Players on the West Coast. Novelist Cyrus Townsend Brady sued Famous Players for using his story without his consent; modern sources credit Townsend.

    Original review from  The Moving Picture World  (January 1914):

    Mary Pickford, the celebrated film favorite, makes her reappearance in the productions of the Famous Players in ‘Hearts Adrift,’ a tragic epic of the deep… The pathos of this drama is softened by Miss Pickford’s charming and piquant portrayal of the role of the little half-savage Nina. At frequent periods in the story Miss Pickford attains high dramatic power, and strikes a distinct note in her delicate rendition of her supreme sacrifice of self for love.

     

    A Good Little Devil*

    Released March 01, 1914

    (Only one reel remains)

    Role: Juliet
    Co-stars: Ernest Truex, William Norris, David Belasco, Iva Merlin, Wilda Bennett, Arthur Hill, Edward Connelly
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation
    Director: Edwin S. Porter (and J. Searle Dawley, uncredited)
    Screenwriter: Based on the play by Austin Strong, adapted from the French play  Un bon petit diable by Rosemonde Gerard and Maurice Rostand
    Cinematographer: Edwin S. Porter

    Note: Mary had played the same role in David Belasco’s 1913 stage version of  A Good Little Devil.

    Original review from Variety (March 6, 1914):

    Here’s one film on which the movie exhibitor of the country can’t go wrong. … There’s a lot of good, wholesome fun in ‘A Good Little Devil’ and there’s fantastical trimmings of the fairy land sort and real pathos of the typical kind that motherless little kids encounter each day that combine in making the play a movie worth while. Miss Pickford does bully work as the blind girl and makes the role stand out as a lovable, childlike sympathetic bit of acting that is irresistible.

     

    Tess of the Storm Country

    Released March 20, 1914

    Role: Tessibel ‘Tess’ Skinner
    Co-stars: Harold Lockwood, Olive Golden, David Hartford, James Gordon, Boots Wall
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company
    Director: Edwin S. Porter
    Screenwriter: B.P. Schulberg, based on the 1909 novel by Grace Miller White
    Cinematographer: H. Lyman Broening
    Filming Location: Santa Monica and Del Mar, CA

    Note:  An enormous success at the box office,  Tess of the Storm Country  would be re-made three times; Pickford’s own 1922 update, a 1932 Fox talkie with Janet Gaynor, and again at Fox in 1960 with Diane Baker in the title role.

    Original review from  Variety  (March 27, 1914):

    In ‘Hearts Adrift’ and ‘A Good Little Devil,’ Mary Pickford had no opportunity to demonstrate her true value as a movie actress. In ‘Tess of the Storm Country’ … Little Mary comes into her own and her work in this five-part movie production so far o’ershadows her work in the other films there’s no comparison. As the little, expressive-eyed tatterdemalion of the Lake Cayuga shores, Miss Pickford sticks another feather in her movie crown which will help the Famous Players reap a benefit in more ways than one.

     

    The Eagle’s Mate

    Released July 10, 1914

    Role: Anemone Breckenridge
    Co-stars: James Kirkwood, Ida Waterman, Robert Broderick, Harry C. Browne, Helen Gillmore, Jack Pickford, R.J. Henry, J. Albert Hall
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: James Kirkwood
    Screenwriter: Eve Unsell, based on the 1914 novel by Anna Alice Chapin
    Cinematographer: Emmett A. Williams

    Note: Long considered lost, a print of  The Eagle’s Mate  was acquired by the George Eastman House in 2000.

    Original review from  Variety  (July 10, 1914):

    Mary Pickford … is one of the few picture actresses, or actors for that matter, who can interject personality into a negative. She breathes the role taken, and it fits her, up, down and all around. … ‘The Eagle’s Mate’ is a lively feature without a real kick – but it has Mary Pickford, better than the best kick or punch that could have been put in, for Mary Pickford is the Ruth Chatterton of the movies.

     

    Such a Little Queen*

    Released September 21, 1914

    Role: Queen Anna Victoria
    Co-stars: Carlyle Blackwell, Harold Lockwood, Russell Bassett, Arthur Hoops
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: Edwin S. Porter, Hugh Ford
    Screenwriter: Hugh Ford, based on the 1909 stage play by Channing Pollock
    Cinematographer: Ernest Hall

    Note:  Originally produced at Broadway’s Hackett Theatre in 1909,  Such a Little Queen  was remade by Realart Pictures in 1921, with Constance Binney in the lead.

    Original review from  The Moving Picture World  (Oct. 3, 1914):

    Miss Mary Pickford has the role of Queen Anna Victoria of Herzegovina; and her performance is that of rare quality which we always expect from this star. Comedy and drama are alike to her. She is as delightful in the one as she is moving in the other. As a comedienne she seldom does the anticipated; and therein to a great degree lies the charm of her work.

     

    Behind the Scenes

    Released October 26, 1914

    Role: Dolly Lane
    Co-stars: James Kirkwood, Lowell Sherman, Ida Waterman, Russell Bassett
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: James Kirkwood
    Screenwriter: Based on the 1911 play by Margaret Mayo
    Cinematographer: Emmett A. Williams

    Note:  Behind the Scenes  is notable in being one of the few films in which Mary portrays an actress.

    Original review from  Variety  (Oct. 31, 1914):

    In this feature Miss Pickford is seen from every angle in all of her camera moods, and to those who are Pickford fans it will be a feast. … The cuteness of Mary Pickford is proverbial. She alone can carry this picture, and that she will to big returns goes without saying, for besides Pickford, it has ‘the stage’ from the inside.

     

    Cinderella

    Released December 28, 1914

    Role: Cinderella
    Co-stars: Owen Moore, Isabel Vernon, Inez Marcel, Lucille Carney, Georgia Wilson, W.N. Cone, Inez Marcel
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: James Kirkwood
    Screenwriter: Based on the 1697 story by Charles Perrault

    Note:  Known prior to its release as  The Stepsister,  Cinderella  features Mary’s then-husband Owen Moore as Prince Charming.

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (Jan. 3, 1915):

    Miss Pickford portrays every phase of the fairy heroine’s career, from pathetic cinder girl to bejeweled princess, with equal charm and winsomeness, and every scene is made more appealing by the beauty and grace of the beloved little film star.

     

    Mistress Nell

    Released February 01, 1915

    Role: Nell Gwyn
    Co-stars: Owen Moore, Arthur Hoops, Ruby Hoffman, Amelia Rose, J. Albert Hall, Nathaniel Sack
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: James Kirkwood
    Screenwriter: Based on the 1900 play by George Cochran Hazelton

    Note:  Mistress Nell  marked Mary’s final appearance onscreen with Owen Moore.

    Original review from  Variety  (May 14, 1915):

    Mary Pickford and beautiful scenery are the important factors in this feature produced by the Famous Players. … At Miss Pickford’s first appearance on the screen in this picture at the Strand Sunday a rousing reception was given her. … ‘Mistress Nell’ was a successful play and it is going to be a successful feature through Mary Pickford being in it.

     

    Fanchon the Cricket

    Released May 10, 1915

    Role: Fanchon, the cricket
    Co-stars: Jack Standing, Lottie Pickford, Gertrude Norman, Russell Bassett, Richard Lee, Jack Pickford
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: James Kirkwood
    Screenwriter: James Kirkwood, Frances Marion (uncredited), based on the 1849 novel  La Petite Fadette  by George Sand
    Cinematographer: Edward Wynard
    Filming Location: Delaware Water Gap, PA

    Note: According to Fred Astaire, the young performer met all three Pickfords while visiting the set in Delaware Water Gap.

    Original review from  The Moving Picture World  (May 22, 1915):

    The charm of the cricket has made its appeal to the poets from the days of Anacreon, but there was never a sweeter cricket than Fanchon and let me hasten to add there never was a Fanchon like Mary Pickford. Yes, I know that the greatest of the French and the English and the American stars have attempted and have successfully rendered Fanchon, but I stick to my belief that none ever surpassed and few approached the work of Mary Pickford.

     

    The Dawn of a Tomorrow

    Released June 07, 1915

    Role: Glad
    Co-stars: David Powell, Forrest Robinson, Robert Cain, Margaret Seddon, Blanche Craig, Ogden Childe
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: James Kirkwood
    Screenwriter: Eve Unsell, based on the 1906 novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett

    Note: The Dawn of a Tomorrow  was re-released by Paramount in 1919.

    Original review from  Variety  (June 18, 1915):

    The Famous Players in this latest Mary Pickford feature has turned out a subject that carries plenty of interest in theme with a brand of first grade photography supporting it to land it among the top-notch list of current releases. Pickford is given full reign in her tattered garments and Pickford in rags can do considerable before a camera.

     

    Little Pal

    Released July 01, 1915

    Role: ‘Little Pal’
    Co-stars: Russell Bassett, George Anderson, William Lloyd, Constance Johnson, Joseph Manning, Bert Hadley
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: James Kirkwood
    Screenwriter: Marshall Neilan
    Cinematographer: Emmett A. Williams

    Note:  Little Pal  would prove to be one of Mary’s least popular roles; she played an Inuit girl at the insistence of Adolph Zukor, who sought to increase her worldwide popularity by casting her as women of different nationalities.

    Original review from  Variety  (July 2, 1915):

    ‘Little Pal’ will be welcome to those who claim there is such thing as a ‘platonic friendship,’ outside the stage or between book covers. Now the pictures have it, in the Famous Players’ latest Mary Pickford production. … The F.P. has its customary faultless production. Several exquisite snow scenes are pictured at intervals. … the picture is an interesting one.

     

    Rags

    Released August 02, 1915

    Role: Rags/Alice McCloud
    Co-stars: Marshall Neilan, Joseph Manning, J. Farrell MacDonald
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: James Kirkwood
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, Mary Pickford, based on the 1915 novel by Edith Barnard Delano
    Cinematographer: Emmett A. Williams

    Note:  Some sources claim that Pickford was the inspiration for Delano’s novel; whether or not this is true, the role of a fiery mining-town girl suited the actress perfectly and was a box-office smash. According to Mary, it was seeing the large crowds lined up to see  Rags  that led her to renegotiate her contract with Famous Players.

    Original review from  The Moving Picture World  (Aug. 14, 1915):

    In writing the scenario for ‘Rags’ it is evident that Edith Barnard Delano had the most likable traits of Mary Pickford’s personality in mind and aimed to produce a story in which they might be revealed in all their variety. … From beginning to end it is a picture of the winsome little star in a career humorous and pathetic by turns and occasionally dramatic.

     

    Esmeralda*

    Released September 06, 1915

    Role: Esmeralda Rogers
    Co-stars: Ida Waterman, Fuller Mellish, Arthur Hoops, William Buckley, Charles Waldron
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: James Kirkwood
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1881 play by Frances Hodgson Burnett and William Gillette, adapted from the 1887 short story by Burnett
    Cinematographer: Emmett A. Williams

    Note:  Though reviews of the film were not overwhelmingly positive,  Esmeralda  was another smash hit for Mary; the Strand in New York reported “packed houses” and “standing-room only” shows. Sadly, the only remaining copy of the film decomposed due to improper storage in the 1950s and is now lost.

    Original review from  Photoplay  (Nov. 1915):

    Miss Pickford is enshrined in the hearts of all the people, not because she is the sweetest of the limpid non-entities, but because she is a young woman of powerful personality and extraordinary dramatic talent. Hers is the art which conceals itself. Such hen-yarn drama as ‘Esmeralda’ is as unworthy of criticism as it is unworthy of Mary Pickford.

     

    A Girl of Yesterday*

    Released October 07, 1915

    Role: Jane Stuart
    Co-stars: Jack Pickford, Gertrude Norman, Marshall Neilan, Frances Marion, Lillian Langdon, Claire Alexander, Glenn Martin
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: Allan Dwan
    Screenwriter: Mary Pickford, story by Wesley C. MacDermott
    Filming Location: Airplane scenes shot at Griffith Park; Catalina scenes shot aboard John Spreckels’ yacht; Interiors shot at Clune Studios in Hollywood, CA (now Raleigh Studios).

    Note:  A Girl of Yesterday  is notable for being the only feature in which Mary and Jack Pickford play brother and sister. Mickey Neilan credits Frances Marion with writing the story.

    Original review from  Variety  (Oct. 15, 1915):

    ‘A Girl of Yesterday’ with Mary Pickford as the star … is so arranged to give Mary Pickford an opportunity to display a lot of gowns and the fact that she can play a little golf, is a good little sailor, is not afraid to go up in an airship and, last, but not least, it gives the public another opportunity of looking at this little queen of the screen.

     

    Madame Butterfly

    Released November 07, 1915

    Role: Cho-Cho-San
    Co-stars: Marshall Neilan, Olive West, Jane Hall, Lawrence Wood, Caroline Harris, M.W. Rale, W.T. Carleton, David Burton, Frank Dekum, Caesere Gravina
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: Sidney Olcott
    Screenwriter: Based on the 1898 novella by John Luther Long
    Cinematographer: Hal Young
    Filming Location: New Jersey, New York City

    Note: Broadway producer David Belasco was the first to dramatize Long’s story for his 1900 stage production.

    Original review from  Variety  (Nov. 12, 1915):

    For many moons it has been stated, and repeated, in the motion picture fraternity that Mary Pickford was a wonderful artist along certain lines, but that said lines were limited and quite circumscribed. This statement had become so familiar that it was generally accepted as a fact. Well, you Doubting Thomases and Unbelievers, go to the Strand this week to see her in the Famous Players’ (Paramount) production of ‘Mme. Butterfly’ and disabuse your minds of any such idea once and for all. … Words are useless to describe the beauty and artistry of it all – the production, the photography … and above all else, Mary Pickford. The Famous Players has never turned out a finer feature – nor indeed has anybody else.

     

    The Foundling

    Released January 03, 1916

    Role: Molly O
    Co-stars: Edward Martindel, Maggie Weston, Mildred Morris, Marcia Harris, Tammany Young
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players-Mary Pickford Co./Paramount Pictures
    Director: John B. O’Brien
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion
    Filming Location: Famous Players Studio, 128 West 56th Street, New York City
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Note:  The Foundling  was the first of her films to be produced by Mary.

    Original review from  The Moving Picture World  (Jan. 8, 1916):

    It is a typical Mary Pickford story in which we see Miss Pickford in ‘The Foundling,’ the Famous Players five-part release of January 3. There are present those elements which in greater or less degree have been factors in her most successful pictures. … Miss Pickford is at her best. ‘The Foundling’ should be one of the more popular Pickford releases.

     

    Poor Little Peppina

    Released February 20, 1916

    Role: Peppina
    Co-stars: Eugene O’Brien, Antonio Maiori, Ernest Torti, Edwin Mordant, Jack Pickford, Edith Shayne, Caesere Gravina, W.T. Carleton
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players-Mary Pickford Co./Paramount Pictures
    Director: Sidney Olcott
    Screenwriter: Story by Kate Jordan
    Filming Location: New York City
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from  The New York Times  (Feb. 21, 1916):

    There is nothing mysterious about the hold this little actress has on her public. In all her moods there is a fascination that does not elude the camera. She is always dainty, spontaneously playful … becomingly demure, and prettily sentimental. So when Mary smiles her audience smiles with her; when she makes love, hand clasps out front are tightened; and when she hangs her pretty head with its curls handkerchiefs absorb briny moisture from the sea of upturned faces.

     

    The Eternal Grind

    Released April 17, 1916

    Role: Mary
    Co-stars: Loretta Blake, Dorothy West, John Bowers, Robert Cain, J. Albert Hall
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: John B. O’Brien
    Screenwriter: William H. Clifford
    Cinematographer: Emmett Williams

    Original review from  Everybody’s Magazine  (May 1916):

    Mary Pickford’s recent film, ‘The Eternal Grind,’ is typical. She works in a sweat-shop. How poor she is! And how sweaty is that shop! But how bravely she bears it! … Then comes villainy. She looks into his eyes. And, really, she is a magnificent actress, and that is the sort of moment when she is at her best. Her face can change from happy innocence to suspicion, to dread, to flaming hate, while still retaining all its innocence…

     

    Hulda from Holland

    Released July 31, 1916

    Role: Hulda
    Co-stars: Frank Losee, John Bowers, Russell Bassett, Harold Hollacher, Charles E. Vernon
    Prod/Dist Co: Famous Players Film Company/Paramount Pictures
    Director: John B. O’Brien
    Screenwriter: Scenario by Edith Barnard Delano
    Cinematographer: Emmett Williams
    Filming Location: Dutch village exteriors shot in Water Mill, Southampton, NY.

    Original review from  The Moving Picture World  (Aug. 12, 1916):

    ‘Hulda from Holland’ as a picture will delight friends of Miss Pickford everywhere. Hulda as a characterization is filled with charm, with the distinctive bits that seem to be Miss Pickford’s sole property in spite of manifold efforts by numerous others to appropriate them.

     

    Less Than the Dust

    Released November 05, 1916

    Role: Radha
    Co-stars: David Powell, Frank Losee, Mary Alden, Mario Majeroni, Caesere Gravina, Francis Joyner, Russell Bassett, Nathaniel Sack
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: John Emerson
    Screenwriter: Scenario by Hector Turnbull
    Cinematographer: George W. Hill
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Less Than the Dust  was the first film released under Famous Players’ new Artcraft division.

    Original review from  The Motion Picture World  (Nov. 18, 1916):

    Artcraft’s bow to the photoplay public is a most happy one. It provides in the first place an excellent story; in the second place it brings back to the screen Mary Pickford, now for several months among the absentees. … The story is ‘very much Pickford’ but by no manner of means is it ‘too much Pickford.’ The popular player dominates the production, but she has fine support – from every department that enters into the making of a picture.

     

    The Pride of the Clan

    Released January 07, 1917

    Role: Marget MacTavish
    Co-stars: Matt Moore, Warren Cook, Kathryn Browne Decker, Ed Roseman, Joel Day
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: Maurice Tourneur
    Screenwriter: Scenario by Elaine S. Carrington and Charles E. Whittaker
    Cinematographers: John van den Broek, Lucien Andriot
    Filming Location: Marblehead, MA

    Note: Co-star Matt Moore was Owen Moore’s brother, and a successful actor in his own right. The Pride of the Clan was the first film shot in the Marblehead area.

    Original review from  Forest Leaves  (Jan. 12, 1917):

    The wonderful heart appeal as well as the dramatic finesse in ‘The Pride of the Clan’ makes it an offering that will prove of universal appeal. … Mary Pickford’s appearance is always one of charm. No matter whether she is in rags, there is always the same charm, the same winsomeness and the same sweetness that makes her so appealing to everyone.

     

    The Poor Little Rich Girl

    Released March 05, 1917

    Role: Gwendolyn, ‘Gwen’
    Co-stars: Madlaine Traverse, Charles Wellesley, Gladys Fairbanks, Frank McGlynn, Emile LaCroix, Marcia Harris, Herbert Prior
    Prod/Dist Co: Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: Maurice Tourneur
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1913 play by Eleanor Gates
    Cinematographers: John van den Broek, Lucien Andriot
    Filming Location: Biograph Studios, Fort Lee, New Jersey

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (March 13, 1917):

    A curious and appealing combination of delightful comedy and fairy story with a moral is ‘Poor Little Rich Girl.’ Mary Pickford is its star … and the Pickford star is of the never-grow-old type. She looks a trifle older than 11 years, but she is the child in manner, feeling and appearance, too, in her skirtlets and pajamas. … A pretty and amusing play – with some faults and lumps to swallow – but, altogether, good. And then – it has Mary!

     

    A Romance of the Redwoods

    Released May 14, 1917

    Role: Jenny Lawrence
    Co-stars: Elliott Dexter, Tully Marshall, Raymond Hatton, Charles Ogle, Walter Lang, Winter Hall
    Prod/Dist Co: Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: Cecil B. DeMille
    Screenwriter: Cecil B. DeMille and Jeanie Macpherson
    Cinematographer: Alvin Wyckoff
    Filming Location: Exteriors shot near Santa Cruz, CA; Interiors shot at Famous Players-Lasky Studio at 1520 Vine St. in Hollywood, CA.

    Original review from  Current Opinion  (July 1917):

    As usual, Mary Pickford, for whom this scenario was written, carries the honors and success of the picture on her capable shoulders. Without her charm and simplicity of acting it would be quite another story. … It is remarkable how much Mary Pickford makes of a series of very ordinary situations in what would otherwise be a mediocre melodrama.

     

    The Little American

    Released July 02, 1917

    Role: Angela More
    Co-stars: Jack Holt, Raymond Hatton, Hobart Bosworth, James Neill, Ben Alexander, Lila Lee
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: Cecil B. DeMille
    Screenwriter: Jeanie Macpherson, Cecil B. DeMille and Clarence J. Harris (uncredited)
    Cinematographer: Alvin Wyckoff
    Filming Location: Famous Players-Lasky Studio at 1520 Vine St. in Hollywood, CA
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from  Variety  (July 13, 1917):

    It’s a Pickford. ‘Nuf said. Just Mary Pickford, the same Mary that one has seen in a score of other pictures, only this time she is made the central figure of a war story. A story that is commonplace enough in itself, but which is saved through the remarkable production that Cecil DeMille has given it.

     

    Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm

    Released September 22, 1917

    Role: Rebecca Randall
    Co-stars: Eugene O’Brien, Helen Jerome Eddy, Charles Ogle
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: Marshall Neilan
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1909 play by Charlotte Thompson and Kate Douglas Wiggin, adapted from the 1903 novel by Kate Douglas Wiggin
    Cinematographer: Walter Stradling
    Filming Location: Exterior scenes shot in Pleasanton, CA. Farm house scenes shot in Gladwyne, PA and at nearby Valley Forge Studios; Interiors shot at Famous Players-Lasky Studio at 1520 Vine St. in Hollywood, CA.

    Note: A young ZaSu Pitts had a role as an extra in the film.

    From Variety (Sept. 14, 1917):

    Superlatives, so indiscriminately used with reference to pictures in many instances, seem inadequate in properly approximating the transcendent merit of the latest Artcraft production, ‘Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm,’ with Mary Pickford in the titular role. It is a master work that is going to stand supreme in its particular niche for several years to come. … Miss Pickford plays as she never played before, varying lights and shades to elicit the major interest, tearful at one moment and laughing the next, holding the auditor at all times in mute admiration.

     

    All-Star Production of Patriotic Episodes for the Second Liberty Loan*

    Released October 01, 1917

    (Partial copy exists)

    Co-stars: Douglas Fairbanks, William S. Hart, Julian Eltinge
    Prod/Dist Co: Paramount Pictures Corporation
    Director: Marshall Neilan

     

    A Little Princess

    Released November 05, 1917

    Role: Sara Crewe
    Co-stars: Norman Kerry, Katherine Griffith, ZaSu Pitts, Ann Schaefer, William E. Lawrence, Theodore Roberts
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: Marshall Neilan
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1905 novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett
    Cinematographer: Walter Stradling
    Filming Location: Famous Players-Lasky Studio at 1520 Vine St. in Hollywood, CA
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Note: Assistant director Howard Hawks got his first chance to direct when he stepped behind the camera for certain scenes of A Little Princess.

    Original review from  Variety  (Nov. 23, 1917):

    Miss Pickford … is perhaps in her most fitting role in what was probably the most popular of all Mrs. Burnett’s novels, next to ‘Fauntleroy.’ Everyone who reads it will want to see its picturization. Others shouldn’t miss it. When they go they will find Miss Pickford at her best.

     

    Stella Maris

    Released January 21, 1918

    Role: Miss Stella Maris/Unity Blake
    Co-stars: Ida Waterman, Herbert Standing, Conway Tearle, Marcia Manon, Josephine Crowell
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: Marshall Neilan
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1913 novel by William J. Locke
    Cinematographer: Walter Stradling

    Original review from  Variety  (Jan. 25, 1918):

    … Mary Pickford is given an opportunity to act and the manner in which she grasped it will prove a revelation to her many followers. … There are two characters in Mr. Locke’s story of great importance. One was Stella Maris and the other Unity Blake. Miss Pickford plays them both. In the former she is the sweet ingénue type one expects her to be, but in the latter she is a deformed little slatternly slavey that will make you rub your eyes and look twice to assure yourself it is Pickford.

     

    Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley

    Released March 11, 1918

    Role: Amarilly Jenkins
    Co-stars: William Scott, Kate Price, Ida Waterman, Norman Kerry, Margaret Landis, Tom Wilson
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: Marshall Neilan
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1915 novel by Belle K. Maniates
    Cinematographer: Walter Stradling
    Filming Location: Famous Players-Lasky Studio at 1520 Vine St. in Hollywood, CA

    Original review from  Photoplay  (June 1918):

    Mary Pickford follows her remarkable ‘Stella Maris’ with another character study scarcely less remarkable, Amarilly Jenkins in ‘Amarilly of Clothesline Alley.’ The role is midway between the hopelessly tragic slavey in ‘Stella Maris’ and the pathetically optimistic Stella herself. … All this is done in Mary Pickford’s blithest vein, reminding us once more that she is the greatest of all screen actresses.

     

    M’liss

    Released April 18, 1918

    Role: Melissa ‘M’liss’ Smith
    Co-stars: Theodore Roberts, Thomas Meighan, Tully Marshall, Charles Ogle, Monte Blue, Winifred Greenwood
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: Marshall Neilan
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1873 novel by Bret Harte
    Cinematographer: Walter Stradling
    Filming Location: San Bernardino Mountains near Idyllwyld, CA

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (April 8, 1918):

    It matters not to Mary Pickford whether she is posed as a saint or a little devil – she falls gracefully into either attitude, and stays persistently ‘in the picture’ till the film fades into the circumambient nothing. Which is only another way of telling you – what you know already – that Mary is a consummate actress, imbued with art to her very finger tips, and even to her very toe tips. (Her feet are more expressive than most people’s faces.)

     

    How Could You, Jean?*

    Released June 23, 1918

    Role: Jean Mackaye
    Co-stars: Casson Ferguson, Spottiswoode Aitken, Herbert Standing, Fanny Midgley, Larry Peyton, ZaSu Pitts
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: William Desmond Taylor
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1917 novel by Eleanor Hoyt Brainerd
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (July 1, 1918):

    Mary Pickford is without doubt the most adorable young thing on the screen, the loveliest, the most fascinating, the best comedienne of them all. And in ‘How Could You, Jean?’ the screen version of one of Eleanor Hoyt Brainerd’s galvanically sprightly stories, our Mary has been given opportunities for comedy that compel her to show us her very best paces.

     

    Johanna Enlists

    Released September 15, 1918

    Role: Johanna Renssaller
    Co-stars: Anne Schaefer, Fred Huntley, Monte Blue, Douglas MacLean, Emory Johnson, Wallace Beery
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: William Desmond Taylor
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1917 short story  The Mobilizing of Johanna  by Rupert Hughes
    Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (Sept. 16, 1918):

    Does anybody in pictures give us better, sweeter, more wholesome and natural comedy than Mary Pickford? And how does she manage to look forever like 14? And what does she do to her lovely face to make it so ugly when she wills? All these things are secrets of her wonderful art, and we would like to know.

     

    One Hundred Percent American (short)

    Released October 05, 1918

    Role: Mayme
    Co-stars: Loretta Blake, Theodore Reed, Monte Blue
    Prod/Dist Co: Liberty Loan Committee/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation
    Director: Arthur Rosson

     

    Captain Kidd, Jr.*

    Released April 06, 1919

    Role: Mary MacTavish
    Co-stars: Douglas MacLean, Spottiswoode Aitken, Robert Gordon, Winter Hall, Marcia Manon, Victor Potel
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Film Corporation/Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, Artcraft Pictures Corporation
    Director: William Desmond Taylor
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1916 play by Rida Johnson Young
    Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from  Variety  (April 25, 1919):

    As a whole ‘Captain Kidd, Jr.’ is rather a disappointment. The story isn’t there in picture form, the production is cheap and as a feature production, with Miss Pickford as the star, it fails to stand up at anytime. The only amusing touch in the entire picture was the parrot that shrieked curses on everybody, and these were the only laughs that were forthcoming.

     

    Daddy-Long-Legs

    Released May 11, 1919

    Role: Jerusha ‘Judy’ Abbott
    Co-stars: Milla Davenport, Percy Haswell, Mahlon Hamilton, Fay Lemport, Lillian Langdon, Wesley Barry, Marshall Neilan
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/First National Exhibitors’ Circuit
    Director: Marshall Neilan
    Screenwriter: Agnes Christine Johnson and Mary Pickford (uncredited), based on the 1912 novel by Jean Webster
    Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
    Filming Location: Busch Gardens in Pasadena, CA
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (May 19, 1919):

    … You’ve never known Mary Pickford or ‘Daddy-Long-Legs’ either until you’ve seen them in the marvelous picture brew which that amazingly clever young star has given us. ‘Daddy-Long-Legs’ was delicious as a story; delightful as a play, and is entrancing as a picture. A crowded house went fairly into raptures yesterday, and applause, even at that cold 12:45 performance…

     

    The Hoodlum

    Released August 31, 1919

    Role: Amy Burke
    Co-stars: Ralph Lewis, Kenneth Harlan, Dwight Crittendon, Melvin Messenger, Aggie Herring, Andrew Arbuckle
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/First National Exhibitors’ Circuit
    Director: Sidney Franklin
    Screenwriter: Based on the 1915 novel  Burkses Amy  by Julie Mathilde Lippmann
    Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from  Variety  (Sept. 5, 1919):

    Whatever others may hand to the First National with the idea of slipping the same thing past the public, Mary Pickford gives that organization the real goods. … ‘The Hoodlum’ will pack them in as it did this week locally, and, better still, it will send them away delighted and happy, for this little blonde star’s amazing talents are hers lightly and charmingly in evidence.

     

    Heart o’ the Hills

    Released November 30, 1919

    Role: Mavis Hawn
    Co-stars: Harold Goodwin, Allan Sears, Fred Huntley, Clare McDowell, Sam De Grasse, John Gilbert
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/First National Exhibitors’ Circuit
    Director: Joseph De Grasse, Sidney Franklin
    Screenwriter: Bernard McConville and Madeline Matzen, based on the 1913 novel The Heart of the Hills by John Fox, Jr.
    Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
    Filming Location:San Bernardino Mountains near Redlands, CA and Big Bear Lake
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from Photoplay (Feb. 1920):

    Mary Pickford herself, as the wild little Mavis Hawn, once more enters into her physical descriptions with the fury of a novice who has everything to gain and nothing to lose – and the painstaking care and cunning detail of the celebrated performer who has everything to lose and very little to gain: altogether, an unbeatable combination of talents.

     

    Pollyanna

    Released January 18, 1920

    Role: Pollyanna Whittier
    Co-stars: Wharton James, Katherine Griffith, Helen Jerome Eddy, William Courtleigh, Herbert Prior, Howard Ralston
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
    Director: Paul Powell
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1915 play by Catherine Chisholm Cushing, adapted from the 1913 novel by Eleanor H. Porter
    Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
    Filming Location: Banks House on Monterey St. in South Pasadena, CA
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (Jan. 20, 1920):

    Whatever opinion you may hold of the strength of ‘Pollyanna’ as a play for the screen, you cannot deny the artistry of its star, whose light, far from becoming dimmer as time goes on, seems to be always attaining a nearer place to the zenith of its brightness. … the Mary that is shining forth in the screen adaptation of Eleanor H. Porter’s novel … is a being who radiates a beacon-light ideal – an ideal in which is blended everything that causes human aspiration to be worth while.

     

    Suds

    Released June 27, 1920

    Role: Amanda Afflick
    Co-stars: Albert Austin, Harold Goodwin, Rosa Dione, Nadine Montgomery, Darwin Karr, Hal Wilson
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
    Director: John Francis Dillon
    Screenwriter: Scenario by Waldemar Young, based on the 1905 play  Op O’ Me Thumb  by Frederick Fenn and Richard Pryce
    Cinematographers: Charles Rosher, L.W. O’Connell
    Filming Location: Robert Brunton Studios at 5451 Marathon St. in Hollywood, CA
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (Jul. 12, 1920):

    …the Pickfordian cleverness and charm are effulgently present, and the question which was on everybody’s lips some time during the action was, how is it possible for anyone to look so beautiful and so ugly at the same time as Miss Pickford does? … In ‘Suds’ we have, therefore, another gay, glad Pickford feature, with a disappointing finish which is offset, partially, by the cleverness of the star’s artistry.

     

    The Love Light

    Released January 09, 1921

    Role: Angela Carlotti
    Co-stars: Evelyn Dumo, Raymond Bloomer, Fred Thomson, Edward Phillips, Albert Prisco, George Rigas
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Productions/United Artists
    Director: Frances Marion
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion
    Cinematographers: Charles Rosher, Henry Cronjager
    Filming Location: Coastal scenes shot near Carmel, CA; Lighthouse scenes shot at Point Fermin, near San Pedro, CA
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Note: Initially titled  A Flame in the Dark,  The Love Light  story was conceived by Frances Marion while visiting Italy.

    Original review from  Variety  (Jan. 14, 1921):

    With any other star ‘The Love Light’ might be classed as an exceptionally good program picture … but with Miss Pickford it is certain to suffer by comparison with her other pictures. She is a symbol of sunshiny girlishness, and does not fit well into a garb of mature morbidity. Mary in motherhood is not Mary as the millions know – and want her.

     

    Through the Back Door

    Released May 05, 1921

    Role: Jeanne
    Co-stars: Gertrude Astor, Wilfred Lucas, Helen Raymond, C. Norman Hammond, Elinor Fair, Adolphe Menjou
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
    Director: Alfred E, Green, Jack Pickford
    Screenwriter: Gerald C. Duffy and Marion Fairfax
    Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
    Filming Location: Partly shot on location at Ellis Island, NY
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (May 5, 1921):

    Miss Pickford’s latest picture, ‘Through the Back Door’ … has the usual smile-and-tear story, but never since ‘Stella Maris’ has Mary revealed more exquisite and compelling powers of successfully paging our smiles and our tears. I’ll defy you not to laugh hilariously at Mary as the mischievous kid, who told to scrub the floor, mounts the two big scrub brushes and uses them as skates over the slippery floor.

     

    Little Lord Fauntleroy

    Released September 11, 1921

    Role: Cedric Errol/Widow Errol
    Co-stars: Claude Gillingwater, Joseph J. Dowling, James A. Marcus, Kate Price, Fred Malatesta, Madame de Bodamere
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
    Director: Alfred E. Green, Jack Pickford
    Screenwriter: Bernard McConville, based on the 1886 novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett
    Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
    Filming Location: The Kohl Mansion in Burlingame, CA
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from  Variety  (Sept. 23, 1921):

    ‘Little Lord Fauntleroy’ is a perfect Pickford picture. … Miss Pickford shows a range of versatility between the blue-blooded and somber mother and the blue-blooded but mischievous kid, that is almost startling. She meets herself many times in double exposures, and she is taller than herself and different from herself, and incredibly true to each.

     

    Tess of the Storm Country

    Released November 12, 1922

    Role: Tessibel ‘Tess’ Skinner
    Co-stars: Lloyd Hughes, Gloria Hope, David Torrence, Forrest Robinson, Jean Hersholt, Danny Hoy
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
    Director: John S. Robertson
    Screenwriter: Scenario by E. Lloyd Sheldon and Josephine Lovett, adapted by Elmer Harris from the 1909 novel by Grace Miller White and the 1911 play by Rupert Hughes
    Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
    Filming Location: Lake Chatsworth, CA
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review by Martin J. Quigley (Nov. 1922):

    We shall not be surprised if Miss Pickford’s new production of the famous story of ‘Tess of the Storm Country’ becomes the most popular picture ever made. We do not view it as one of those sensational and timely successes which creates a great furor for a moment and then quickly shifts away to make way for another similar skyrocket hit. This picture is almost here to stay; it will go on year after year – and it is eminently deserving of it.

     

    Rosita

    Released September 03, 1923

    Role: Rosita, a street singer
    Co-stars: Holbrook Blinn, Irene Rich, George Walsh, Charles Belcher, Frank Leigh, Mathilde Comont
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
    Director: Ernst Lubitsch, Raoul Walsh (uncredited)
    Screenwriter: Edward Knoblock and Hanns Kräly, story by Norbert Falk, from the 1844 play Don César de Bazan by Adolphe Philippe Dennery and Philippe François Pinel
    Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
    Art Decorator: William Cameron Menzies
    Filming Location: Pickford-Fairbanks Studios in Hollywood, CA
    Produced by Mary Pickford
     
    Note: Future Fox star Charles Farrell has a bit part in the film.
     
    Original review from  Variety  (Sept. 6, 1923):

    Enter Mary Pickford, actress, as Rosita in a screen production of the same name directed by Ernst Lubitsch. A Mary Pickford different and greater than at any time in her screen career; a Mary Pickford with her hair done up, pretty as a picture and displaying acting ability few thought her capable of. … ‘Rosita’ is going to mark an epoch in the career of this star.

     

    Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall

    Released May 25, 1924

    Role: Dorothy Vernon
    Co-stars: Anders Randolf, Marc McDermott, Carrie Daumery, Allan Forest, Wilfred Lucas, Clare Eames, Estelle Taylor
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Productions/United Artists
    Director: Marshall Neilan, Mary Pickford (uncredited)
    Screenwriter: Adapted by Waldemar Young from the 1898 novel  When Knighthood Was in Flower  by Charles Major
    Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
    Filming Locations: Interiors shot at Pickford-Fairbanks Studios in Hollywood, CA; Outdoor scenes shot at Busch Gardens in Pasadena, CA.
    Produced by Mary Pickford
     
    Note: Mitchell Leisen designed Mary’s costumes for the film, several of which are in the Natural History Museum in Los Angeles.
     
    Original review from  Photoplay  (July 1924):

    This new effort of Mary Pickford, one of the late Charles Major’s historical romances, is exceedingly beautiful pictorially. …. Miss Pickford is  Dorothy  and the title role will please her army of followers. Although lovely optically, it offers little new. Workmanlike of technique, her acting strikes no big spark. It is careful and considered all the way. This mood of care seems to run all through the production.

     

    Little Annie Rooney

    Released October 18, 1925

    Role: Annabell ‘Little Annie’ Rooney
    Co-stars: William Haines, Walter James, Gordon Griffith, Carlo Schipa, Spec O’Donnell, Hugh Fay, Vola Vale
    Prod/Dist Co: Mary Pickford Company/United Artists
    Director: William Beaudine
    Screenwriter: Louis D. Lighton and Hope Loring, adapted from the story by Mary Pickford (credited as Katherine Hennessey); titles by Tom McNamara (uncredited)
    Cinematographers: Charles Rosher, Hal Mohr
    Filming Locations: Pickford-Fairbanks Studios in Hollywood, CA
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (Oct. 23, 1925):

    A new popular triumph goes to Mary Pickford. Her picture ‘Little Annie Rooney’ will be hailed far and wide as great entertainment. It is the most amusing comedy she has made in ages, and marks her return to the hoyden type of role in which she has always won the height of favor. … From the reception accorded ‘Little Annie Rooney’ last night it would be safe to predict that it will be one of the most enjoyed pictures that Mary has made within the past three or four years.

     

    The Black Pirate

    Released March 08, 1926

    Role: Princess Isobel in Final Embrace (uncredited cameo)
    Stars: Douglas Fairbanks, Billie Dove, Anders Randolf
    Prod/Dist Co: The Elton Corporation/United Artists
    Director: Albert Parker
    Screenwriter: Jack Cunningham, story by Douglas Fairbanks

     

    Sparrows

    Released May 14, 1926

    Role: Molly
    Co-stars: Roy Stewart, Mary Louise Miller, Gustave von Seyffertitz, Charlotte Mineau, Spec O’Donnell, Lloyd Whitlock
    Prod/Dist Co: The Pickford Corporation/United Artists
    Director: William Beaudine, Tom McNamara (uncredited)
    Screenwriter: Story by Winifred Dunn, adaptation by C. Gardner Sullivan, titles by George Marion, Jr.
    Cinematographers: Charles Rosher, Karl Struss, Hal Mohr
    Filming Location: Pickford-Fairbanks Studios in Hollywood, CA
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (April 25, 1926):

    Among the pictures Mary Pickford has made in the past five or six years, ‘Sparrows’ stands absolutely supreme. By many it will, in fact, be acclaimed her greatest picture. … For ‘Sparrows’ is not only a remarkable triumph for its star – it is one of the most human and thrilling experiences that has ever been offered through the medium of the screen.

     

    A Kiss From Mary Pickford

    Released September 09, 1927

    A Kiss From Mary Pickford - 1927

    Role: Mary Pickford
    Co-stars: Igor Ilyinsky, Anel Sudakevich, Vera Malinovskaya, Douglas Fairbanks
    Prod/Dist Co: Mezhrabpom-Rus
    Director: Sergei Komarov
    Screenwriter: Sergei Komarov
    Filming Location: Soviet Union

     

    My Best Girl

    Released October 31, 1927

    Role: Maggie Johnson
    Co-stars: Charles ‘Buddy’ Rogers, Sunshine Hart, Lucien Littlefield, Carmelita Geraghty, Hobart Bosworth, Evelyn Hall
    Prod/Dist Co: The Pickford Corporation/United Artists
    Director: Sam Taylor
    Screenwriter: Allen McNeil and Tim Whelan, adapted by Hope Loring from the 1927 novel by Kathleen Norris
    Cinematographer: Charles Rosher
    Filming location: Pickford-Fairbanks Studios in Hollywood, CA
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Note: Carole Lombard has an uncredited role in the film as a flirtatious shopgirl.

    Original review from  Photoplay  (Dec. 1927):

    With a story by Kathleen Norris, an adaptation by Hope Loring, an ‘America’s Sweetheart’ to play in it, the picture could not fail to be interesting. … You will carry away memories of the beautiful love episode between Mary Pickford and Charles ‘Buddy’ Rogers. … The love scenes between these two are marvelous – beautiful, clean, and gripping. The best picture Mary has made in several years.

     

    The Gaucho

    Released January 01, 1928

    Role: Our Lady of the Shrine (cameo)
    Stars: Douglas Fairbanks, Lupe Velez, Joan Barclay
    Prod/Dist Co: The Elton Corporation/United Artists
    Director: F. Richard Jones
    Screenwriter: Douglas Fairbanks (as Elton Thomas)

     

    Coquette

    Released April 12, 1929

    Role: Norma Besant
    Co-stars: Johnny Mack Brown, Matt Moore, John St. Polis, William Janney, Henry Kolker, Louise Beavers
    Prod/Dist Co: The Pickford Corporation/United Artists
    Director: Sam Taylor
    Screenwriter: John Grey and Allen McNeil, adapted from the 1927 play by George Abbott and Ann Preston Bridgers; dialogue by Sam Taylor
    Cinematographers: Karl Struss and G.W. Bitzer
    Set Decorator: William Cameron Menzies
    Produced by Mary Pickford and Sam Taylor

    Note: Coquette was Mary Pickford’s first sound film, and the film for which she received a Best Actress Academy Award.

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (April 5, 1929):

    ‘Coquette’ is the picture, and it is, as the popular designation goes, all talking. It brings Miss Pickford to the screen in a role unlike any that she has ever played previously. It discloses her changed in appearance by virtue of her bobbed hair. It demonstrates that she has a voice of lovely timbre, and that she knows how to use it with taste, and with even more definite discretion. … See ‘Coquette.’ It is another milestone.

     

    Taming of the Shrew

    Released October 26, 1929

    Role: Katherine
    Co-stars: Douglas Fairbanks, Edwin Maxwell, Dorothy Jordan, Joseph Cawthorn, Clyde Cook, Geoffrey Wardwell
    Prod/Dist Co: The Elton Corporation, The Pickford Corporation/United Artists
    Director: Sam Taylor
    Screenwriter: Sam Taylor, adapted from the play by William Shakespeare
    Cinematographer: Karl Struss
    Art Decorators: William Cameron Menzies and Laurence Irving
    Editor: Allen McNeil
    Produced by Mary Pickford

    Original review from  Variety  (Dec. 4, 1929):

    A money picture, easily, for it’s worth 75 cents for anyone to see Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks do this kind of stuff in a vastly extravagant burlesque of Bill Shakespeare’s best laugh. The two stars often turn that into a howl. … As this was built for laughs only and gets them, nothing else matters. For laughs get money, and besides the laughs you have Mary Pickford, with Douglas Fairbanks – and Shakespeare at last!

     

    Kiki

    Released March 14, 1931

    Role: Kiki
    Co-stars: Reginald Denny, Joseph Cawthorn, Margaret Livingston, Phil Tead, Fred Walton, Edwin Maxwell
    Prod/Dist Co: Feature Productions, Inc./United Artists
    Director: Sam Taylor
    Screenwriter: Sam Taylor, based on David Belasco’s 1921 adaptation of the 1920 play by André Picard
    Cinematographer: Karl Struss
     

    Original review from  Photoplay  (May 1931):

    You’ll thrill tremendously at the metamorphosis of ‘America’s Sweetheart.’ Here’s no sugary, sticky-sweet Pickford; here’s the little rascal as much like the Mary of old as tabasco’s like syrup. Mary’s gone hot! – and saucily sophisticated. She prances in underthings, somersaults furiously in pajamas, gets bounced from a doorway. She lets herself be utterly ludicrous. You’ll laugh at the queen – but how you’ll love her! Why has Mary been hiding all this fire?

     

    Secrets

    Released March 15, 1933

    Role: Mary Marlowe/Mary Carlton
    Co-stars: Leslie Howard, C. Aubrey Smith, Ned Sparks, Blanche Friderici, Doris Lloyd, Herbert Evans, Allan Sears
    Prod/Dist Co: The Pickford Corporation/United Artists
    Director: Frank Borzage
    Screenwriter: Frances Marion, based on the 1922 play by Rudolf Besier and May Edginton; additional dialogue by Salisbury Field and Leonard Praskins
    Cinematographer: Ray June
    Produced by M.C. Levee and Mary Pickford
     
    Note: Leslie Howard’s role was originally intended for Gary Cooper.
     

    Original review from the  Los Angeles Times  (June 19, 1933):

    Mary Pickford gives a sterling proof of her capacity as an actress in ‘Secrets.’ … A genuinely poignant sequence is the death of the heroine’s baby during the western scenes… This scene is the high point of the picture dramatically, and shows that in evoking a depth of sympathetic feeling Miss Pickford can be as able and convincing as ever. Handkerchiefs were abundantly in evidence during its unfoldment.

     

    Star Night at the Cocoanut Grove

    Released December 01, 1934

    Role: Herself
    Prod Co: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer